#Literacy, Animal Facts, Clever Kids Corner, education, Preschool

10 Rabbits You Should Consider As A Pet

As pets, dwarf rabbits are becoming increasingly popular. Larger and larger pets are becoming more popular as animal companions also, which might lead to health issues later in their lives. Dwarf rabbits, on the other hand, are believed to live longer than larger rabbit types. They are also very adorable, as well as, intelligent and capable of forming strong ties with humans.

1. Mini Lop

Despite its youth, the Mini Lop, also known as the dwarf lop rabbit, is one of the most popular dwarf rabbit breeds. They have a short and wide body shape with a rounded shape. They have a strong musculature for a small rabbit breed, and their head is relatively large in comparison to the rest of their body. The name ‘lop’ refers to their ears which hang down the side of their head. They have a rounded tip, but are not as long as some lop rabbit breeds.

mini lop

They have a high proportion of guard hairs, which make up their outer coat. When showing Mini Lop in rabbit shows, a wide range of colors are acceptable, which is agouti, broken, pointed white, self, shaded, ticked, or wide-band color groups. In adults, their body weight should range between 2.5 and 3.5 kg.

2. Netherland Dwarf

Even among little dwarf rabbit breeds, the Netherland Dwarf rabbit is the smallest. Their body weight ranges from 0.5 kg to 1 kg. Despite their small size, they are robust and muscular, allowing them to move with incredible flexibility. Their head is also large in comparison to the rest of their body, but they have an extremely short neck.

netherland dwarf

The roots of this rabbit breed can be traced back to the Netherlands, as the name implies. The examples we know today may be very different from their ancestors, which were produced at the turn of the twentieth century. Today you can find them in many colors such as self-group, shaded group, agouti group, tan pattern group, fawn, Himalayan, orange, steel, and tortoiseshell.

3. Jersey Wooly

Another unusual and little-known rabbit is the Jersey Wooly rabbit. The breed originated in the United States, notably in the state of New Jersey, from where their name derives. Their appeal as a pet extends far beyond their lovely look with wide variety of colors and also long wooly coat. They are also naturally gentle and affectionate.

jersey wooly rabbit

The Jersey Wooly is regarded as “the rabbit that does not kick” in its native land. They have a fairly balanced temperament and rarely show symptoms of hostility, making them quite friendly in their daily lives. This dwarf rabbit breed was created in the 1970s through crossbreeding between the French Angora rabbit and the Dutch Dwarf rabbit. The Jersey is characterized by their compact and muscular body, small erect ears on a square head. These ears only measure around 2″. Adult individuals can weigh up to 1.5 kg 

4. Holland Lop

During the 1940s, Adrian de Cock developed the Holland Lop rabbit breed by selectively crossing the English Lop, the French Lop, and the Netherland Dwarf rabbit breeds. The Holland Lop weighs between 0.9 and 1.8 kg and has a compact and sturdy body covered in profuse smooth and silky fur.

holland lop

The breed now has the color of agouti, broken, pointed white, self, shaded, ticked, or wide-band color groups. The head is noticeably flattened with their lopped ears being medium length and giving them an adorably cute appearance.

5. Lionhead Rabbit

One of the most eye-catching miniature rabbit breeds is the Lionhead rabbit. Its name relates to its most distinguishing feature, a mane of long, fluffy hairs on its head resembling those of a lion. However, many people lose their manes as they grow older. The dwarf rabbits’ ears, which can grow to be more than 7 cm long, are another distinguishing trait. This causes them to be big in comparison to the rest of their body, though their fuzzy mane can sometimes disguise them. There is, however, a Lionhead rabbit variety with shorter and more upright ears. 

lionhead rabbit

Lionhead rabbits are a miniature rabbit breed that can weigh up to 2 kg. They are tough, but the fluff, which can come in a variety of colors, makes them appear larger than they are. The eyes are rounded and nicely spaced from one another. They have a rounded skull and a snout that is slightly extended. This breed can be traced back to its Belgian origins, but it was finished to the standard we see now in England.

6. Dwarf Hotot

dwarf hotot

Mme Eugenie Bernhard raised this rabbit in France, notably Hotot-en-Auge, from where it gets its name. Since their introduction in 1902, these dwarf rabbits have received worldwide acclaim for their stunning look and kind, friendly demeanor. The contrast of totally white fur and brown eyes encased in a dramatic black ring is the dwarf rabbit’s most distinguishing trait.

This color contrast draws attention to the Dwarf Hotot’s gorgeous eyes, making them appear much larger than they truly are. We must not, however, overlook their adorable little ears that perch atop their head and are relatively uncommon.

7. Lagomorphs

These little lagomorphs from England have a broad, compact, and muscular body with an equally broad and slightly curved skull (when in profile). They have wide, brilliant eyes that give them a captivating appearance. Their longest, densest, and most plentiful trait is their long, dense, and plentiful fur.

Mini Satin

This can have a variety of solid and distinguishing color patterns. Its long, drooping ears give it a soft appearance. Their delicate coat is quite pleasant to the touch, but they require meticulous upkeep to avoid knots, filth buildup, and digestive issues caused by hairballs in the gastrointestinal tract.

8. Britannia Petite Rabbit

The Britannia Petite is another rabbit breed that originated in England from rabbits brought over from Poland. It is one of the oldest dwarf rabbit breeds, with origins dating back to the nineteenth century, owing to the popularity of animal exhibitions at the time. Its most distinguishing trait is its arched body, which has earned it a favorite in rabbit displays.

This arch is almost as curled as a quarter of a circle and spans from the base of its neck to its tail. The belly button is also somewhat elevated, adding to the arching appearance. Its head is shaped like a wedge, and its eyes protrude slightly. Their ears are short and pointed, and they tend to stand upright.

These tiny rabbits are notable for their high level of energy. As a result, they require a significant amount of daily exercise to maintain both physical health and stable behavior. Because of their small size, they do not require a large hutch to keep them in, but they do require a huge run in which to expend their energy. It is recommended that kids have access to open area where they can run, jump, and play with their families whenever feasible.

9. Mini Angora

The English Angora rabbit is a popular rabbit breed due to its sensitive looks and dense coat. Originally, its breeding was devoted to exploitation of its fur for wool, which is why you may have heard of them from the famous angora jumpers created from its wool. They are, nevertheless, becoming increasingly popular as pets. They require a lot of care and grooming due to their thick coat. This is to avoid knots, hairballs, and other hygienic issues.

Not all Angora rabbis are diminutive. The Giant Angora rabbit, contrary to popular belief, is everything but. Despite being smaller than most rabbits, the English Angora is not a dwarf rabbit. Norma Spencer, a breeder in New Zealand, has bred the Mini English Angora rabbit. They gained their small stature by breeding with Netherland rabbits, but they are very rare, even in their homeland.

10. Columbia Basin Pygmy

The Columbia Basic pygmy rabbit is one of the tiniest dwarf rabbit breeds. Adults weigh no more than 500 g.

During the 1990s, the breed was on the verge of extinction. Unfortunately, there are no purebred Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits, but the breed is still alive and well. Nonetheless, they remain one of the world’s rarest rabbit breeds.

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