#Budgeting, #Healthy, #Literacy, Animal Facts, Boundaries, Clever Kids Corner, Cooking, E-Learning, EdTech, education, Exercising, Gardening, Grocery Shopping, Housing, Media Tools, Movies, Newborns, Newborns, Nighttime Routines, Outdoor Activities, Parenting, Personality Traits, Positive Home Environment, Preschool, Professional Development, RentAssistance, Self-Care, Sleep, Teachers, Technology, Thifting, Toddlers, Toddlers, Traveling, Virtual Learning, Weather

Educators! Win a Gift Card to Insomnia Cookies!

Educators! Click the link and take a quick survey to WIN a gift card to Insomnia Cookies!

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/QDK5SJW

#Literacy, Preschool

July’s Book List- A Positive Representation of African American Children

It’s July 1st! If you have started to read to your young child, or deciding to begin this month, this list will be extremely beneficial to you.

Carmin Cares

Age Group: 2-5

Author: Karen Kilpatrick

When Carmin gets gum on her shoe while playing on the playground, she decides it’s time that someone did something about the mess and that “someone” may as well be her! But Carmin’s not old enough to clean the whole park by herself, so what can she do? It turns out that even the littlest kids can find ways to encourage people to take care of their community — and their environment. This cheerful picture book with a positive message is a fun read and a great way to prompt discussions about how kids can help.

When Grandma Gives You A Lemon Tree

Ages: 3-7

Author: Jamie L.B. Deenihan

Sometimes, even if you give Grandma a very careful list of electronic gadgets you’d like for your birthday… she’ll give you a lemon tree instead. If that happens, you should be polite and say thank you, and you definitely should not try to get rid of it (even if you do come up with some clever ideas.) Instead, put it somewhere sunny and give it just enough water, and with a little time, you might just have some delicious home-made lemonade (recipe included)! This wry and clever book about the joys of tending a growing plant is sure to make kids giggle, and give them a new appreciation of all the good things that can come from a little patience.

I Love My Hair!

Ages: 3-7

Author: Natasha Anastasia Tarpley

Kenaya is a little girl with a big imagination. Every night, she and her mother sit down for the dreaded ritual of combing Kenaya’s thick hair. But as Kenaya’s mother tells her all the wonderful and different ways she can wear her hair, Kenaya imagines those styles in fantastic ways, from thread on a spinning wheel to rows of plants in a garden to her favorite style, two ponytails that become wings that let her soar high above the world. This tribute to the beauty of naturally textured hair is sure to delight.

Who’s Knees Are These?

Ages: 2-5

Author: Jabari Asim

A vibrant, multicultural board book that celebrates a baby’s sweet knees, for fans of Ten Tiny Fingers and Ten Little Toes. Parents and children will enjoy this interactive board book full of toddler appeal that is perfect for celebrating a baby’s adorable knees.

Crown, An Ode To The Fresh Cut

Ages: 3 and up

Author: Derrick Barnes

A fresh cut makes boys fly. The barbershop is where the magic happens. Boys go in as lumps of clay and, with princely robes draped around their shoulders, a dab of cool shaving cream on their foreheads, and a slow, steady cut, they become royalty. That crisp yet subtle line makes boys sharper, more visible, more aware of every great thing that could happen to them when they look good: lesser grades turn into As; girls take notice; even a mother’s hug gets a little tighter. Everyone notices. Read this book to boost the esteem of your young son.

Not Quite Snow White

Ages: 4-8

Author: Ashley Franklin

Tameika loves to perform on stage and whether she’s acting, singing, or dancing, she always puts on a great show. So when her school decides to put on a musical version of Snow White she can’t wait to audition… until she hears her peers talking behind her back about how she’s too tall, too chubby, and too brown for the role. Fortunately, Tameika’s parents give her just the right reassurance she needs to nail the audition and show there’s no one right way to be a princess. Text that emphasizes Tameika’s passion and drive and images that highlight the joy she takes in acting combine to create an empowering story of self-confidence and individuality.

#Literacy, Animal Facts, Clever Kids Corner, education, Preschool

10 Rabbits You Should Consider As A Pet

As pets, dwarf rabbits are becoming increasingly popular. Larger and larger pets are becoming more popular as animal companions also, which might lead to health issues later in their lives. Dwarf rabbits, on the other hand, are believed to live longer than larger rabbit types. They are also very adorable, as well as, intelligent and capable of forming strong ties with humans.

1. Mini Lop

Despite its youth, the Mini Lop, also known as the dwarf lop rabbit, is one of the most popular dwarf rabbit breeds. They have a short and wide body shape with a rounded shape. They have a strong musculature for a small rabbit breed, and their head is relatively large in comparison to the rest of their body. The name ‘lop’ refers to their ears which hang down the side of their head. They have a rounded tip, but are not as long as some lop rabbit breeds.

mini lop

They have a high proportion of guard hairs, which make up their outer coat. When showing Mini Lop in rabbit shows, a wide range of colors are acceptable, which is agouti, broken, pointed white, self, shaded, ticked, or wide-band color groups. In adults, their body weight should range between 2.5 and 3.5 kg.

2. Netherland Dwarf

Even among little dwarf rabbit breeds, the Netherland Dwarf rabbit is the smallest. Their body weight ranges from 0.5 kg to 1 kg. Despite their small size, they are robust and muscular, allowing them to move with incredible flexibility. Their head is also large in comparison to the rest of their body, but they have an extremely short neck.

netherland dwarf

The roots of this rabbit breed can be traced back to the Netherlands, as the name implies. The examples we know today may be very different from their ancestors, which were produced at the turn of the twentieth century. Today you can find them in many colors such as self-group, shaded group, agouti group, tan pattern group, fawn, Himalayan, orange, steel, and tortoiseshell.

3. Jersey Wooly

Another unusual and little-known rabbit is the Jersey Wooly rabbit. The breed originated in the United States, notably in the state of New Jersey, from where their name derives. Their appeal as a pet extends far beyond their lovely look with wide variety of colors and also long wooly coat. They are also naturally gentle and affectionate.

jersey wooly rabbit

The Jersey Wooly is regarded as “the rabbit that does not kick” in its native land. They have a fairly balanced temperament and rarely show symptoms of hostility, making them quite friendly in their daily lives. This dwarf rabbit breed was created in the 1970s through crossbreeding between the French Angora rabbit and the Dutch Dwarf rabbit. The Jersey is characterized by their compact and muscular body, small erect ears on a square head. These ears only measure around 2″. Adult individuals can weigh up to 1.5 kg 

4. Holland Lop

During the 1940s, Adrian de Cock developed the Holland Lop rabbit breed by selectively crossing the English Lop, the French Lop, and the Netherland Dwarf rabbit breeds. The Holland Lop weighs between 0.9 and 1.8 kg and has a compact and sturdy body covered in profuse smooth and silky fur.

holland lop

The breed now has the color of agouti, broken, pointed white, self, shaded, ticked, or wide-band color groups. The head is noticeably flattened with their lopped ears being medium length and giving them an adorably cute appearance.

5. Lionhead Rabbit

One of the most eye-catching miniature rabbit breeds is the Lionhead rabbit. Its name relates to its most distinguishing feature, a mane of long, fluffy hairs on its head resembling those of a lion. However, many people lose their manes as they grow older. The dwarf rabbits’ ears, which can grow to be more than 7 cm long, are another distinguishing trait. This causes them to be big in comparison to the rest of their body, though their fuzzy mane can sometimes disguise them. There is, however, a Lionhead rabbit variety with shorter and more upright ears. 

lionhead rabbit

Lionhead rabbits are a miniature rabbit breed that can weigh up to 2 kg. They are tough, but the fluff, which can come in a variety of colors, makes them appear larger than they are. The eyes are rounded and nicely spaced from one another. They have a rounded skull and a snout that is slightly extended. This breed can be traced back to its Belgian origins, but it was finished to the standard we see now in England.

6. Dwarf Hotot

dwarf hotot

Mme Eugenie Bernhard raised this rabbit in France, notably Hotot-en-Auge, from where it gets its name. Since their introduction in 1902, these dwarf rabbits have received worldwide acclaim for their stunning look and kind, friendly demeanor. The contrast of totally white fur and brown eyes encased in a dramatic black ring is the dwarf rabbit’s most distinguishing trait.

This color contrast draws attention to the Dwarf Hotot’s gorgeous eyes, making them appear much larger than they truly are. We must not, however, overlook their adorable little ears that perch atop their head and are relatively uncommon.

7. Lagomorphs

These little lagomorphs from England have a broad, compact, and muscular body with an equally broad and slightly curved skull (when in profile). They have wide, brilliant eyes that give them a captivating appearance. Their longest, densest, and most plentiful trait is their long, dense, and plentiful fur.

Mini Satin

This can have a variety of solid and distinguishing color patterns. Its long, drooping ears give it a soft appearance. Their delicate coat is quite pleasant to the touch, but they require meticulous upkeep to avoid knots, filth buildup, and digestive issues caused by hairballs in the gastrointestinal tract.

8. Britannia Petite Rabbit

The Britannia Petite is another rabbit breed that originated in England from rabbits brought over from Poland. It is one of the oldest dwarf rabbit breeds, with origins dating back to the nineteenth century, owing to the popularity of animal exhibitions at the time. Its most distinguishing trait is its arched body, which has earned it a favorite in rabbit displays.

This arch is almost as curled as a quarter of a circle and spans from the base of its neck to its tail. The belly button is also somewhat elevated, adding to the arching appearance. Its head is shaped like a wedge, and its eyes protrude slightly. Their ears are short and pointed, and they tend to stand upright.

These tiny rabbits are notable for their high level of energy. As a result, they require a significant amount of daily exercise to maintain both physical health and stable behavior. Because of their small size, they do not require a large hutch to keep them in, but they do require a huge run in which to expend their energy. It is recommended that kids have access to open area where they can run, jump, and play with their families whenever feasible.

9. Mini Angora

The English Angora rabbit is a popular rabbit breed due to its sensitive looks and dense coat. Originally, its breeding was devoted to exploitation of its fur for wool, which is why you may have heard of them from the famous angora jumpers created from its wool. They are, nevertheless, becoming increasingly popular as pets. They require a lot of care and grooming due to their thick coat. This is to avoid knots, hairballs, and other hygienic issues.

Not all Angora rabbis are diminutive. The Giant Angora rabbit, contrary to popular belief, is everything but. Despite being smaller than most rabbits, the English Angora is not a dwarf rabbit. Norma Spencer, a breeder in New Zealand, has bred the Mini English Angora rabbit. They gained their small stature by breeding with Netherland rabbits, but they are very rare, even in their homeland.

10. Columbia Basin Pygmy

The Columbia Basic pygmy rabbit is one of the tiniest dwarf rabbit breeds. Adults weigh no more than 500 g.

During the 1990s, the breed was on the verge of extinction. Unfortunately, there are no purebred Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits, but the breed is still alive and well. Nonetheless, they remain one of the world’s rarest rabbit breeds.

#Literacy, Animal Facts, Clever Kids Corner, Virtual Learning

The Rosy Boa

The rosy boa is a wonderful pet. It’s a small, hardy feeder that’s easy to breed, and rosy boas are normally very docile and handled well. This species thrives as a beginner pet with the right snake supplies and a focus on reptile conservation and wellbeing.

rosy boa

Care Requirement

When it comes to keeping rosy boas as pets, simple cages perform wonders. Most significantly, every cage must be escape proof; if a rosy boa sees even the tiniest opening in its enclosure, it will most likely escape. There are several (better) escape-proof cages on the market, and it’s a good idea to get one. As a suggestion, have an enclosure with a non-abrasive top, such as filtering.

Otherwise, due to rostral abrasion, the snake could need medical attention. Rosy boas are known for rubbing their snouts on cage surfaces in an attempt to avoid their confinement.

Hatchling rosy boas may be kept in deli cups or other small containers of equivalent scale. It’s important to provide enough airflow, which you can easily accomplish by punching tiny holes in the cup’s side or lid. Your rosy boa’s enclosure can expand as well. Shoebox-sized enclosures are ideal for medium-sized rosy boas. Make sure to keep adults in 10-gallon reptile terrariums. These enclosures are easy to clean and are great for setting up thermal regimes that are beneficial to the captive rosy boa.

Heat

Placing heat tape under one side of the cage is the simplest way to do this. A good pulse-proportional thermostat is needed to keep the heat tape at a steady temperature. Pulse-proportional thermostats keep the cage bottom at a steady temperature (plus or minus 1 degree Fahrenheit), protecting it from overheating.

A temperature gradient of 65 degrees at the cool end to 90 degrees at the warm end of the enclosure is a decent place to start. If your rosy boa is continually jumping around the cage, adjust the selection.

Light

Snake lighting isn’t needed for rosy boas unless you choose to use it to help you see your pet.

Humidity

Provide a humidity retreat, which uses a sealed jar with an entry hole lined with damp sphagnum moss or paper towels to provide moisture in a similar way (a water dish is still provided outside the retreat).

Make sure you have a good enough dish for your snake to soak in. During sheds, soaking is particularly necessary. Some owners choose to have a covered dish with a hole in the lid to provide protection for the snake and allow it to soak for longer if needed.

Substrate

Snake beddings such as newspaper, paper towels, and wood shavings may be used as rosy boa substrate. A substrate depth of 1 to 2 inches makes for quick upkeep and allows the snake to burrow, adding to its sense of protection. Spot clean at least twice a week, and adjust the whole substrate six to seven times a year with reptile cleaning materials.

A gallon of water mixed with a few tablespoons of soap and a few tablespoons of bleach makes an excellent cleaning solution.

rosy boa

Behavior

Rosy Boas are sluggish snakes who only emerge from their rock crevices on special occasions. They reach three feet in length and need little maintenance, making them ideal for beginners. Rosy Boas are shy snakes who seldom leave their burrows in the wild. As a result, much of their irrational action is understudied.

Most owners stated that they don’t bite. Instead if they feel threatened they release a foul smelling liquid from their vent or ball up and hide their heads.

Adults are docile, well-tolerated, and seldom bite. It’s possible the young Rosy Boas are afraid of humans and being treated. Allow at least two weeks for them to adapt to their new environment before treating them. Working with your Boa to socialize them because they love handling is a good idea. Keeping the snake for 10 to 15 minutes per day for two weeks will do this.

Health Treatment

Respiratory infections and scale rot are typically caused by poor substrates, incorrect humidity, or low enclosure temperatures. This allows for bacterial growth and is easily prevented with correct husbandry.

Internal parasites are typically diagnosed with a fecal exam by a vet. Some snakes may stop eating due to parasite overload. External parasites (e.g. mites) are often treated with increased cage cleaning and anti-mite products.

#Literacy, Clever Kids Corner, Outdoor Activities, Virtual Learning, Weather

Different Types of Rain

Did you know that there are different types of rain?

Rain

Drops larger than drizzle (0.02 inch / 0.5 mm or more) are considered rain. Rain is liquid water that falls from a cloud in the form of droplets. Rain is one of the six main types of precipitation. One droplet of water spends on average around eight days in suspension before falling back to Earth as rain.

Drizzle

Drizzle is light rain falling in very small droplets. Drizzle drops have a diameter of usually less than 0.5 mm. The drops appear almost to float, and so make even slight movements of the air visible. The clouds that produce drizzle have low bases, usually less than 1,000 feet in altitude.

Ice Pellets or Sleet

Ice pellets form when a layer of above-freezing air is located between 1,500 and 3,000 meters (5,000 and 10,000 ft) above the ground, with sub-freezing air both above and below it. Ice pellets are a form of precipitation consisting of small, translucent balls of ice. Ice pellets originate as raindrops or snowflakes (less common) that generally fall from Altostratus or Nimbostratus. They fall into a subcloud layer of warm air where the snowflakes melt or partially melt, and then fall into a cold layer of air (below 0 °C) where they freeze and reach the ground as frozen precipitation.

Hail

Hail is pellets of frozen rain which fall in showers from cumulonimbus clouds. Hail is a form of solid precipitation. It is distinct from ice pellets, though the two are often confused. It consists of balls or irregular lumps of ice, each of which is called a hailstone. Certain parts of the world receive more hail than others. China and Midwestern United States experiences frequent hail storms. In fact, the Great Plains region of the United States and Canada is called “Hail Alley.” Hailstones can cause extreme damage to buildings, vehicles, and crops.

Snow

Snow is precipitation in the form of ice crystals. Once an ice crystal has formed, it absorbs and freezes additional water vapor from the surrounding air, growing into a snow crystal or snow pellet, which then falls to Earth. Snowflakes are clusters of ice crystals that fall from a cloud. Snow may also crunch and creak. A layer of snow is made up of many tiny ice grains surrounded by air and when you step on it, you compress the grains.

Snow Grains

Snow grains are a form of precipitation. Snow grains are characterized as very small, white, opaque grains of ice that are fairly flat or elongated. Their diameter is generally less than 1 mm. Snow grains fall mostly from Stratus or from fog. Snow grains usually fall in small quantities in the mountains.

Ice Crystals

In very cold regions, they are falling crystals of ice in the form of needles, columns, or plates. Ice crystals are solid ice exhibiting atomic ordering on various length scales and include hexagonal columns, hexagonal plates, dendritic crystals, and diamond dust.

#Literacy, Animal Facts, Clever Kids Corner

All About Artic Foxes

Artic Foxes are native to the Artic tundra areas within the Northern Hemisphere.

Artic Foxes thrive in some of the coldest conditions on earth due to their thick and dense coats of fur. Their thick fur coat keeps the foxes body at a toasty 104°F. Their feet also have a layer of thick fur, like built-in snow boots. Arctic foxes also have fur-covered paws that work to keep their bodies warm in the winter.

Arctic Foxes are meat and opportunistic eaters.

Artic Foxes are known to hunt and eat small rodents called lemmings. They even eat fish, birds, and large predators such as polar bears and wolves.

Artic Foxes seek shelter in burrows known as fox den’s.

These dens are built by the fox family and passed down each generation. Yes, Arctic fox dens are used for many generations—some are as old as 300 years. The Arctic Fox’s den has several entrances for security.

Artic Foxes are solitary animals.

During the Fall months, Artic Foxes are solitary animals and preserve fat but do not hibernate. In the Spring months, these Foxes live as families and breed and raid Fox puppies.

Click the photo for a video on Artic Foxes by The National Geographic.

These foxes are fast!

The Artic Fox can sprint up to 50 kilometers or 31 miles per hour!

Artic Foxes live 3 to 6 years.

The mortality is much higher during the cub years and ranges as high as 75%. The oldest Fox recorded was 16 years old.

Artic Fox Activity

Visit IHeartCraftyThings for instructions on this simple craft.
#Literacy, Animal Facts, Clever Kids Corner, Preschool, Toddlers

Amazing Ducks Around The World

Ducks, an animal that we are used to seeing at lakes, ponds and even crossing the road. These aquatic birds can usually be found around swamps, oceans, rivers, ponds, and lakes. All ducks can live wherever there is water and on every continent except Antarctica.

In addition, ducks belong to the same family as geese and show wide interspecies variation. Some stand out because of their stunning fur, uniquely shaped beaks, or calls that are able to grab people’s attention.

1. King Eider (Somateria spectabilis)

King Eider

This unique duck lives along the Arctic coast of the northern hemisphere in Europe, North America and Asia. The King Eider duck has a body size of 50 to 70 cm in length and weighs 1.6 kg. They are able to form large flocks in suitable coastal waters, with some groups exceeding 100,000 birds.

Furthermore, King Eider ducks can dive as deep as 180 feet to feed on marine life.

2. Mandarin Duck (Aix galericulata)

Mandarin Duck

These brightly colored ducks are native to East Asia. However, now you can find them in England, Ireland, and California. In history, Mandarin ducks were captured and escaped that caused extensive breeding. The male Mandarin duck is highly admired, as it has brightly colored fur and a pink beak.

Right now, Mandarin Ducks are facing population decline in Asia due to widespread logging activities and have lost habitat. These ducks have managed to avoid hunters because they are known to have a bad taste. This species has been the subject of art, poetry and other Oriental literary forms for centuries. In ancient literature, they were known as symbols of marital fidelity, largely due to the strong bond of their spouses.

3. Wood Duck (Aix sponsa)

Wood Duck

The Wood Duck is the cousin of Mandarin Duck. You can identify both of them easily by just looking at their color and pattern. This is one of the most colorful species of ducks in North America. As listed above, it also experienced a serious decline and almost became extinct in the late 19th century due to poaching and the loss of large trees where it nestled. Forest conservation efforts, including the preservation of its habitat, namely providing thousands of nest boxes as well as curbing widespread hunting, have brought the population of this species back to normal.

4. Baikal Teal (Anas formosa)

Baikal Teal

Baikal Teal duck also has a pretty interesting appearance, as well. From the green color pattern on the back of the male’s head to the golden yellow feathers that adorn his body. This species stands out from other teal species with its unique green and yellow facial pattern. It is native to east Asia, as well as in Alaska.

5. Hooded Merganser (Lophodytes cucullatus)

Hooded Merganser

Hooded Merganser gets its name from the top of its foldable head. Both males and females have it and can develop it. However, only males have bright black and white markings. Males will perform head -shaking stunts when trying to attract females during the mating season. These small ducks can be found in ponds and in rivers.

6. Surf Scoter (Melanitta perspicillata)

Surf Scoter

Surf Scoter has another name, “skunk-head coot” or “old skunkhead.” This is because of it’s unique black-and-white pattern from other species. The pattern and shape of its body resembles that of a harlequin duck, as well as an Eider Duck. It can be found in the Pacific coastal waters of North America and the Atlantic. You can find this group of species in abundance in the summer. After nesting or mating, a female will migrate to southeastern Alaska, Puget Sound in Washington, Quebec, or New Brunswick. Upon reaching it’s destination, the feathers will fall out and it will lose the ability to fly.

7. Spectacled Eider (Somateria fischeri)

Spectacled Eider

Another Eider Species with a distinctive face is the Spectacular Eider. The pale green feathers on the back of his head and the clear masculine orange color help exaggerate the more spectacular eye marks. These beautiful ducks are found on the coasts of Alaska and Siberia. Also they can be found nesting in the tundra during the summer. This species is not very famous or common. The population of western Alaska has declined by 96 percent since the 1970s.

Its wintering area was recently discovered in the unbroken ocean of ice between St. Lawrence and the St. Matthew Islands in the Bering sea.

8. Smew Duck (Mergellus albellus)

Smew Duck

It is another species of Merganser, which you can find in Europe and Asia. As for appearance, a male has snow white feathers combined with black on the wings and chest. It has black eye marking, like a panda and also a black line on the top of their head. They use woodpecker holes to raise their children.

9. Long -Tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis)

Long tailed Duck

This species is able to defeat the King Eider with its ability to dive as deep as 200 feet, in the sea in search of food. If you want to know it is able to spend the day looking for food underwater. What is the function of a long tail? This is actually a characteristic of a male who has two long tail feathers and a female without these tail feathers.

10. Harlequin Duck (Histrionicus histrionicus)

Harlequin Duck

Not all ducks have greatness like this species. It can be found diving to capture aquatic life in fast -moving mountain waters, rivers, rocky beaches, and even water pools. Males have a unique fur pattern with a chestnut brown appearance and a cast of white spots on the head and body.