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Educators! Win a Gift Card to Insomnia Cookies!

Educators! Click the link and take a quick survey to WIN a gift card to Insomnia Cookies!

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/QDK5SJW

E-Learning, EdTech, education

Canva- A Quick Crash Course Blog

Canva, a more than popular tool most recently used on mobile devices as means of creating stimulating visual marketing and social media related images. However, do you know enough about Canva to become an effective Canva user? I hope you are able to leave this crash course well informed about the many uses of Canva!

There are hundred’s of pre-made templates that you can download and use to DIY your blog’s design. If you are struggling with web design, did you know you can use Canva to design certain elements of your site? Read more about this and other topics below centering around Canva!

10 Types of Visual Designs You Can Create With Canva

  1. Blog Post Image Template
  2. Sidebar Graphics
  3. Blog Email Newsletter Header
  4. Lead Magnet
  5. Content Upgrades
  6. Email Opt-In Mockups
  7. Blog Post Graphics
  8. Blog Post Infographics
  9. Tip-O-Graphics
  10. List-O-Graphics
  11. Blog Media Kit

Many users still don’t know the powerful features of Canva. With Canva, you can create the following:

  • Design product labels
  • Create workbooks / Planners / Ebooks
  • Posters
  • Flyers
  • Banners
  • Invitation cards
  • Logos
  • Templates
  • Photo collages
  • GIFs
  • Mobile videos
  • Infographic
  • Resume
  • Desktop wallpaper
  • Postcard
  • Worksheet
  • Certificate

3 Ways To Enhance Your Blog Posts with Canva

1. Blog Title Image

Canva’s Blog Title design template is best for Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn shares. If you’re looking for a portrait or vertical blog title image for Pinterest and Google+ shares you can use Canva’s Blog Graphic template. It works great!

2. Infographics

The best thing is Canva created an infographic template, which is SO helpful. You can use any of the ready to use template designs and switch out the font, colors, and design elements. Have an outline ready for your infographic, which will make it easier to get done.

3. Photo Collages

Photo collages are a great visual piece with a variety of images in one. You can use the ready-to-use Photo Collage template in Canva to show steps of a recipe or instructions. The Canva photo collage template is square shaped however you can create a photo collage with many of their photo grids.

You can use collages for designs and to display your portfolio. Use the Pinterest template in Canva and the multiple image photo grids as shown below.

Tip: Find the right photo with Canva’s built in photo library

To start, type a keyword or two into the search bar, and choose from any of the photos or illustrations — that means no more Google image searches. The extensive photo library hosts a wide variety of subjects and themes, like abstract images, textures, landscapes, people, and animals. Once you’ve found the perfect image, just drag it over to your design, and drop it where it needs to go.

Canva also allows you to upload your own images and use them on your design, which is perfect for adding your logo and other branded visuals to content.

Tip: Resize your whole design to fit various platforms.

The Magic Resize tool is available for Canva for Work users — a paid plan starting at $12.95 per month. Users of Canva’s free tools can still resize their designs by creating a copy of the original visual. Click “File,” “Change Dimensions,” and select the format to which you’d like to resize the design. That said, Magic Resize is quite a time-saving feature that lets you copy and resize one design into formats for various channels. Just click on “File,” navigate to “Magic Resize,” then choose the different formats you want to use to adapt your visual. Then, click the “resize” button, and you’re done.

Visual content is #Winning!

Social media users are much more likely to engage with posts that have “visuals” tied to them.

EdTech, education

8 Google Sheets Add-Ons For Educators

Below is a collection of Google Sheets add-ons that I believe every teacher and educator should at least be aware of. These are tools that provide you with tons of functionality hacks to enhance your productivity and facilitate your workflow. Some of the things you can do with these add-ons include: creating forms of various types (e.g., quizzes, assignments, surveys, etc), generate PDFs and documents from Sheets’ data, grade and analyze digital assignments, create a class website from spreadsheets, and many more.

FormsCreator

An easy way to generate Google Forms to use for various educational purposes including for surveys, quizzes, assignments, feedback, etc.

Doctopus

Enhances teachers workflow by providing teachers with the ability to “mass-copy, share, monitor student progress, and manage grading and feedback for student projects in Google Drive”.

Autocrat

“Flexible, easy to use document merge tool that creates PDF or shared Documents from spreadsheet data”.

Wikipedia and Wikidata tools

This add-on is great for mining data for your classes. You can use Wikipedia and Wikidata tools to do a ton of information gathering, instantly. The add-on provides you with a host of custom lookups such as WIKITRANSLATE and WIKIGEOCOORDINATES. These functions pull live data straight from Wikipedia into a spreadsheet, enabling teachers to compile an up-to-date and accurate database of facts.

Flubaroo

A Google Spreadsheets Add-on that helps educators quickly grade and analyze online assignments and assessments, as well as share scores with students!”

Sheet2Site

Allows you to create a website for your class using Google Sheets.

Form Publisher

Allows you to generate documents (e.g., Docs, PDF, Sheets, Slides, Word, Excel, and PowerPoint) from data on Google Forms and Google Sheets.

Flippity

Originally, Flippity was designed to help you create online flashcards from Google Sheets, but the range of templates now includes everything from quiz shows and crossword puzzles to spelling and typing tests. The add-on has recently been discontinued but all the same great templates are available directly via the Flippity website.

E-Learning, EdTech

The 7 Components of TPACK For Successful Technology Integration

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At the heart of the TPACK framework, is the complex interplay of three primary forms of knowledge: Content (CK), Pedagogy (PK), and Technology (TK). The TPACK approach goes beyond seeing these three knowledge bases in isolation. The TPACK framework goes further by emphasizing the kinds of knowledge that lie at the intersections between three primary forms: Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK), Technological Content Knowledge (TCK), Technological Pedagogical Knowledge (TPK), and Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK).

Effective technology integration for pedagogy around specific subject matter requires developing sensitivity to the dynamic, transactional relationship between these components of knowledge situated in unique contexts. Individual teachers, grade-level, school-specific factors, demographics, culture, and other factors ensure that every situation is unique, and no single combination of content, technology, and pedagogy will apply for every teacher, every course, or every view of teaching.

May be an image of text that says 'TPACK P (or Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge) is a framework that highlights the interdisciplinary relationship between teaching, learning, and technology.'
May be an image of text that says 'Contexts Technological Pedagogical Knowledge (TPK) Technological Knowledge (TK) Technological Content Knowledge (TCK) TPACK Pedagogical Knowledge (PK) Content Knowledge (CK) Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK)'
  • Content Knowledge (CK) – “Teachers’ knowledge about the subject matter to be learned or taught. The content to be covered in middle school science or history is different from the content to be covered in an undergraduate course on art appreciation or a graduate seminar on astrophysics… As Shulman (1986) noted, this knowledge would include knowledge of concepts, theories, ideas, organizational frameworks, knowledge of evidence and proof, as well as established practices and approaches toward developing such knowledge” (Koehler & Mishra, 2009).
  • Pedagogical Knowledge (PK) – “Teachers’ deep knowledge about the processes and practices or methods of teaching and learning. They encompass, among other things, overall educational purposes, values, and aims. This generic form of knowledge applies to understanding how students learn, general classroom management skills, lesson planning, and student assessment.” (Koehler & Mishra, 2009).
  • Technology Knowledge (TK) – Knowledge about certain ways of thinking about, and working with technology, tools and resources. and working with technology can apply to all technology tools and resources. This includes understanding information technology broadly enough to apply it productively at work and in everyday life, being able to recognize when information technology can assist or impede the achievement of a goal, and being able continually adapt to changes in information technology (Koehler & Mishra, 2009).
  • Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) – “Consistent with and similar to Shulman’s idea of knowledge of pedagogy that is applicable to the teaching of specific content. Central to Shulman’s conceptualization of PCK is the notion of the transformation of the subject matter for teaching. Specifically, according to Shulman (1986), this transformation occurs as the teacher interprets the subject matter, finds multiple ways to represent it, and adapts and tailors the instructional materials to alternative conceptions and students’ prior knowledge. PCK covers the core business of teaching, learning, curriculum, assessment and reporting, such as the conditions that promote learning and the links among curriculum, assessment, and pedagogy” (Koehler & Mishra, 2009).
  • Technological Content Knowledge (TCK) – “An understanding of the manner in which technology and content influence and constrain one another. Teachers need to master more than the subject matter they teach; they must also have a deep understanding of the manner in which the subject matter (or the kinds of representations that can be constructed) can be changed by the application of particular technologies. Teachers need to understand which specific technologies are best suited for addressing subject-matter learning in their domains and how the content dictates or perhaps even changes the technology—or vice versa” (Koehler & Mishra, 2009).
  • Technological Pedagogical Knowledge (TPK) – “An understanding of how teaching and learning can change when particular technologies are used in particular ways. This includes knowing the pedagogical affordances and constraints of a range of technological tools as they relate to disciplinarily and developmentally appropriate pedagogical designs and strategies” (Koehler & Mishra, 2009).
  • Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) – “Underlying truly meaningful and deeply skilled teaching with technology, TPACK is different from knowledge of all three concepts individually. Instead, TPACK is the basis of effective teaching with technology, requiring an understanding of the representation of concepts using technologies; pedagogical techniques that use technologies in constructive ways to teach content; knowledge of what makes concepts difficult or easy to learn and how technology can help redress some of the problems that students face; knowledge of students’ prior knowledge and theories of epistemology; and knowledge of how technologies can be used to build on existing knowledge to develop new epistemologies or strengthen old ones” (Koehler & Mishra, 2009).
The TPACK Image (rights free). Read below to learn how to use the image in your own works. Right click to download the high-resolution version of this image.
Photo Courtesy of TPACK.org

EdTech, Technology

4 Types of Cloud Computing Services

“The cloud” refers to servers that are accessed over the Internet, and the software and databases that run on those servers. Cloud servers are located in data centers all over the world. By using cloud computing, users and companies don’t have to manage physical servers themselves or run software applications on their own machines.

Cloud technologies have transformed how organizations procure and manage infrastructure. With every organization today entering the cloud world, it is essential to understand the different types of services cloud computing offers. Although there are many types of cloud computing services, all these services have a few basic features and advantages in common and can be categorized into four basic cloud service offerings. Organizations can fly their business, small or big, to the cloud with these four different types of cloud computing services.

1. Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)

The lower end of managed cloud computing services where hardware resources are provided by an external provider and managed for you. IaaS provides users access to computing resources such as networking, processing power and data storage capacity. The lower end of managed cloud computing services where hardware resources are provided by an external provider and managed for you. IaaS provides users access to computing resources such as networking, processing power and data storage capacity.

Examples of IaaS: Amazon EC2, Windows Azure, Rackspace, Google Compute Engine.

2. Platform as a Service (PaaS)

This cloud computing service is an advanced version of IaaS. Apart from just providing the IT infrastructure, PaaS also provides the computing platform and solution stack as a service. PaaS is a cloud computing service that provides developers with a framework that can be used for building custom applications. Platform as a Service lets software developers build custom applications online without having to worry about data storage, data serving, and management.

A typical Platform as a Service offering consists of – 

  • Hosting Solutions
  • OS
  • Software tools for design and development.
  • Environment for server-side scripting
  • DBMS
  • Network Access
  • Storage
  • Server Software
  • Support

Examples of PaaS solutions include Microsoft Azure, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, Force.com. by Salesforce, Google App Engine, Rackspace Cloud Sites, OpenShift, and Apache Stratos

3. Software as a Service (SaaS)

A special cloud computing service that incorporates both IaaS and PaaS service offerings. SaaS is a cloud computing service that provides application-level services tailored to diverse business needs such as business analytics, CRM, or marketing automation. SaaS is a cloud computing service offering that provides web-based software applications to customers on-demand. SaaS providers host a fully-functional application through a browser-based interface and make it accessible to the users through the Internet.

SaaS offerings allows the cloud to be leveraged for software architecture thereby reducing the overhead of support, maintenance, and operations as the applications run on systems belonging to the vendor. SaaS is the most familiar cloud computing service offering as users most often interact directly with SaaS applications like Netflix, Gmail, JIRA, Dropbox, or Salesforce.

Examples of SaaS solutions include SAP Business ByDesign, Zoho CRM, AppDynamics, Microsoft Office 365, Pardot Marketing Automation.

4. Functions as a Service (FaaS)

Before we understand Functions as a Service, it is important to understand the most popular tech term associated with FaaS – serverless computing. Serverless computing is a cloud computing model that takes away low-level infrastructure decisions and server management from the developers. The application architect need not deal with the allocation of resources as it is managed by the cloud service provider. 

FaaS is a brand-new and very young cloud computing service acting as a game-changer for many businesses. It is a serverless computing concept that lets software developers develop applications and deploy an individual “function”, piece of business logic, or an action without maintaining a server. It increases the efficiency as developers need not to consider server operations because they are hosted externally. 

Examples of FaaS include Google Cloud Function, Microsoft Azure Functions, Webtask.io, Iron.io , Open Whisk, and AWS Lambda.

EdTech

Moodle Vs. Google Classroom

These two platforms serve a similar purpose, which is online learning. A comparison of Google classroom vs Moodle helps us understand the different approaches towards online learning using different platforms.

Moodle

Moodle is preferred by many teachers and professionals as it is an open-source. Moodle also has many collaborative tools such as Chat, Forum, and Discussions. The Learning Management System facilitates efficient course and user management to allow for easy integration with 3rd party applications. It is based on a modular design that allows educators to design their curriculum using plug-ins to serve various purposes.MoodleCloud comes in two packages: Moodle for Free and Moodle for School.

Moodle does everything that Google Classroom is capable of. But the vice versa is not true. Moodle is huge, vast, and offers a lot more features than Google Classroom. Simply because Google Classroom is not officially an LMS. Teachers can design the entire curriculum right from scratch as Moodle supports plenty of content authoring tools. Moodle also provides parents with access to the grades of their children.

Moodle provides multilingual support, attendance tracking, videoconferencing through BigBlueButton, plenty of gamification modules, enables gamification of tests and quizzes, etc. To make sure learners stay on track and do not drop off, viewing trends of participation, submissions, and other data is incorporated. As a result, it improves the overall e-Learning experience, vastly helping retention rates and student successes.

Tip: Make sure you use more clickable activities, gamification, audio, and video-based learning instead of going for text-based learning. Also, students love learning through games, points, badges, puzzles, crosswords, treasure hunt, and embedded videos.

Google Classroom

Google Classroom is part of the G Suite for Education. It provides a simple and straightforward interface and is accessible via Google account. It encourages collaboration between students and teachers to foster better communication. This tool is a free promotes free collaboration that allows instructors to create online classrooms, invite students, and conduct classroom discussions. For teachers and students to be able to use the platform for e-Learning, their schools must be first registered with Google Classroom. It simplifies the process of creating, distributing and grading assignments. Grading, class organization, and administration can all be managed in its interface.

When working within Google Classroom, it is important to know that you cannot design your own curriculum in the LMS but it is fairly easier to set up classes and assignments. You can even reuse tests or assignments for future classes, set access rights, export grades to Google Sheet, share study resources in the form of videos, links and images with the students. With Google Classroom, you can easily manage classwork and homework assignments into one simple thread. It has everything top-down in one fluid thread for students and teachers to be able to easily find and access.

Google Classroom is a cloud-based platform that integrates Google Apps for education and helps teachers co-ordinate day-to-day training activities.

Major Differences

Pricing– Google Classroom is a free service for teachers and students. However, they can’t sign up unless their school has registered for Google Workspace for Education. The Google Workspace for Education Fundamentals platform is free for qualifying institutions and includes many basic Google features. There are three paid plans:

1. Google Workspace for Education Standard – This plan costs $3 per student, per year and includes all of the features of the Fundamentals platform, plus a security center and other features.

2. Teaching and Learning Upgrade – This plan costs $4 per license, per month and includes all of the features of the Google Workspace for Education Standard, plus advanced Google Meet features (e.g., meetings with up to 250 participants, interactive Q&As, breakout rooms).

3. Google Workspace for Education Plus – This plan costs $50 per student, per year and includes all of the features of the other plans, plus live streams with up to 100,000 in-domain viewers.

Pricing– Moodle’s open-source platform is free to download and install. However, its cloud-based deployment, MoodleCloud, has five paid plans:

  • Starter: $120 per year for 50 users and 250 MB of storage
  • Mini: $210 per year for 100 users and 500 MB of storage
  • Small: $380 per year for 200 users and 1 GB of storage
  • Medium: $840 per year for 500 users and 2.5 GB of storage
  • Large: $1,490 per year for 1,000 users and 5 GB of storage

Features- Some of Google Classroom’s key features include platform branding with school colors/logos, along with the ability to reuse tests, assignments and other content for future classes; share videos, links or images with other students; schedule postings of assignments. Moodle provides many features, such as a mobile app, content authoring tools and support for multiple languages. Some of the features include the BigBlueButton for video/web conferencing, Quizventure for gamification with quizzes and tests, another gamification module called LevelUp that includes progressive checkpoints. Google also has the ability to export grades to Google Sheets and set permissions for student access/commenting. Some new features introduced recently include the ability to send assignments to individual students, email and mobile notifications of assignments’ due dates, and the ability to customize the types of notifications received. Moodle also has Word Count for writing assignments, Chemistry Editor for chemistry assignments, Group Choice for group projects, and Checklists and Attendance tracking.

EdTech

10 Podcast Tools You Should Know About

Podcasts are a great way to build a genuine connection with your audience. Instead of the fractured connection you make through social media, podcasts allow you to engage your audience with unique long-form content. Podcasts are more convenient than blog posts; people can listen to podcasts while driving, working out, or just doing chores around the house.

There is a lot of unexplored space in the podcasting industry. There are at least 600 million blogs, 23 million YouTube channels, but only 800,000 podcasts in Apple Podcasts.

That means for every podcast, there are 750 blogs and 29 YouTube channels.

1. Zoom

Zoom is an excellent free option. You can easily record right in the program, by clicking the “Record” button and choosing where you’d like to save your audio file. Zoom splits both sides of the call, giving you two separate audio tracks. This is helpful when it comes to cutting and editing in post-production.

Zoom recording a podcast interview.

2. Skype

Recording a podcast using Skype offers both pros and cons. Of these pros includes the ability to record using the built in call recorder feature. Also, Skype has become a household name with caters to its popularity in the video conferencing and recording realm of technology. The cons of utilizing Skype is that all users have to have username and password to access the podcast features. The call is recorded over the internet, as opposed to ‘double-ender.’ ‘Double-ender’ call recording has become the default demand of remote podcasters in recent years. It basically means that both sides of a conversation are recorded on separate tracks, locally on the computer of each participant and saved directly to the cloud.

3. SoundCloud

Although this service is mainly for music, spoken-word podcasts are welcome here too. Unlike the other hosting types, though, Soundcloud requires listeners to have an account to download material. People will also need to search for your content in order to find it, meaning you need to create awareness elsewhere. 

4. BuzzSprout

Buzzsprout is another great podcast tool to which can be used on mobile devices. To learn more about this tool, check out the How To Get Started video on Youtube by clicking the photo below:

Buzzsprout

5. Audacity

Audacity is an excellent free option for editing your podcast. It’s especially easy if you plan to use only one take, with few cuts. This option is great for beginners because of the simple cut, copy, and paste functionality. It isn’t the highest quality sound, but it gets the job done.

Audacity editing software for podcasts.

6. Ardour

Ardour is a digital workstation software suitable for marketers working within tight budgets. All you have to do is arrange for a quality audio interface, plug in a microphone or keyboard, and record an audio track. Besides, if you already have an audio file, import it from your hard drive.

7. Podbean

An all-in-one FREE podcasting solution, Podbean is ideal if you don’t have any programming knowledge but still want to build a profitable podcast. Incorporate your corporate branding and customize the theme of your podcasting site.

Distribute-everywhere

8. Facebook LIVE

Free online recording session. Facebook is easily accessible through Android and Apple mobile devices. Podcasters will need to create an account to access the online recording feature.

How to Create Facebook Live Videos that People Actually Want to Watch

9. Garage Band

Garage Band is a free editing software that is available on and comes with most Mac computers. It’s mostly used as a beginner editing program, but is capable of mixing up to 255 audio tracks. It comes with basic editing features including volume levels, cut, copy, and paste. It also features a sound library with effects that you can include in your podcast.

Garage Band for Macs editing podcasts.

10. Podomatic

Podomatic allows you to play your podcast directly from Facebook and Twitter feeds, and you can embed your episodes on the website or share it on social media to maximize visibility. Besides, you can attract listeners to fund your podcast via Patreon, and add your podcast to AdvertiseCast’s marketplace and run ads on Advertisecast. If you don’t have a podcasting site yet, you can make one using a drag-and-drop website building CMS, Weebly or Blogger.

Listening apps
Animal Facts, Clever Kids Corner, EdTech

All About Leopards

This spotted, fierce cat has many interesting features. Read more about the leopard below!

Habitat

  • Leopards are found in Africa and Asia, from the Middle Eastern nations to Russia, Korea, China, India, and Malaysia. Consequently, they live in a wide variety of habitats including forests, mountains, deserts and grasslands.
  • Leopards can live in a range of geographies and climates, from deserts to rainforests, woodlands, grasslands, savannas, forests, mountains, coastal areas, shrublands, and swamps.
  • Studies have shown that leopard subspecies vary in their coloring depending on the area where they reside. Some leopards have different pads on their paws due to their habitat.

Behaviors

  • Leopards are skilled climbers, and like to rest in the branches of trees during the day.
  • Leopards are active at night when they venture out in search for food. They mostly spend their days resting, camouflaged in the trees or hiding in caves.
  • Leopards communicate with each other through distinctive calls. For instance, when a male wants to make another leopard aware of his presence, he’ll make a hoarse, raspy cough.
  • Leopards are predominantly solitary animals that have large territories.
  • Each leopard spends most of its life in its own territory. And to warn other leopards to stay away, they leave scratches on trees, and urine scent marks around their areas.

Body Structure

  • Leopards tend to have distinctive dark spots called rosettes, which create beautiful patterns against their otherwise light fur.
  • Black leopards however have dark fur which makes it difficult to see the spots. They appear almost solid black and are often called black panthers.
  • Snow leopards have, fur-covered feet act as natural snowshoes – helping distribute their weight over soft snow and protecting them from the cold.
  • A leopard’s height can range from 57 to 70 cm and they can reach a length of 90 to 160 cm.
  • Females typically weigh between 17 and 65 kg, and a male usually weighs anywhere from 31 to 75 kg.

Famous Leopards

  • Bagheera- The Jungle Book
  • Sabor- Tarzan
  • Makucha- The Lion Guard

Thanks to Africa Freak and Nat Geo Kids !

EdTech, Media Tools, Professional Development, Teachers, Virtual Learning

What is E-Learning and Instructional Design?

E-learning is the use of computer technologies to explore learning opportunities.

E-learning is not a one-package deal.  There are multiple ways to explore e-learning.

E-learning is not one particular tool or management system.

E-learning centers around providing accessibility and the integration of technology to meet the needs of the varying learning styles of its learners.

“Effective e-learning starts with great instructional design.“

Instructional design requires selecting, organizing, and specifying the learning materials to create an online course.

Instructional design translates high-level objectives to choices for technology and content

Instructional design provides insight on online tools, management systems, and other technologies

Together, we work as a TEAM!

There are numerous instructional design models:

ADDIE Model

Merrills Principles

Multimedia Principle Model

Gagne’s Nine Principles

And many more!

Course Design: Addie Model

Step #1 Analysis — Why is the training/course needed? We collect information and profile target learners, and understanding the needs and expectations of the organization. Analysis drives design and the development process.

Step #2 Design —In this phase, IDs select the instructional strategy to follow, write objectives, choose appropriate media and delivery methods.

Step #3 Development — IDs utilize agreed expectations from the Design phase to develop the course materials.

Step #4 Implementation — The course is released/rolled-out, delivered, to the learners, and its impact is monitored.

Step # 5 Evaluation — Is the course providing the expected results? IDs collaborate with the client and evaluate the impact of the course based on learner feedback, surveys, and even analytics. 

Course Design: Merrill’s Principles

Learning is promoted when learners are engaged in solving real-world problems 

Learning is promoted when prior knowledge is activated as a foundation for new knowledge

Learning is promoted when new knowledge is demonstrated to the learner — they are shown, rather than just being told.

Learning is promoted when new knowledge is applied by the learner — they are required to use their new knowledge or skill to solve problems.

Learning is promoted when new knowledge is integrated into the learner’s world — they are able to demonstrate improvement in their newly acquired skills and to modify it for use in their daily work.

Resources:  Merrill, M.D. (2002). First principles of instructionEducational Technology, Research and Development, 50(3), pp43-59.

Course design:
Alignment of Goals and Objectives

Consider a wide range of goals

Identify real goals through research

Objectives are clear, precise, and worthy

Identify prerequisites

Identify what each objective needs

Identify high value objectives and eliminate unnecessary objectives

Learning Styles

Visual (spatial):You prefer using pictures, images, and spatial understanding.

Aural (auditory-musical): You prefer using sound and music.

Verbal (linguistic): You prefer using words, both in speech and writing.

Physical (kinesthetic): You prefer using your body, hands and sense of touch.

Logical (mathematical): You prefer using logic, reasoning and systems.

Social (interpersonal): You prefer to learn in groups or with other people.

Solitary (intrapersonal): You prefer to work alone and use self-study.

Resources:  https://www.learning-styles-online.com/overview/

Types of Online Learning

Synchronous Learning-
In synchronous learning activities, all students are involved at the same time. Formats include online chats, instant messaging, video or audio conferences, live webcasting and virtual classrooms. 

Asynchronous Learning-
With asynchronous learning, students set their own schedules. An entirely self-paced curriculum fits this model. Courses that have both synchronous and asynchronous components might include discussion forums, email, blogs, videos, webcasting, simulations, and games.

ADA Accessibility

“Establish requirements for making the goods, services, facilities, privileges, accommodations, or advantages offered by public accommodations via the Internet, specifically at sites on the World Wide Web (Web), accessible to individuals with disabilities.”

5 Steps to Creating Accessible Online Content for People with Disabilities

Hyperlinks

Text Design

Images/Graphics

Audio/Visuals

Documents

10 Steps to Designing
a Wildly Successful Online Course 

1. Choose perfect course topic

2.  Ensure course is in high demand

3. Create magnetic and compelling learning outcomes

4. Select and gather course content ¡5. Structure modules and course plan

6. Determine most effective and delivery methods for each lesson

7. Filming, editing and recording online course (i.e. including visuals)

8. Setting up online school through LMS or other platform

9. Ensure pricing is in tact

10. Develop marketing strategy

Resources: https://www.thinkific.com/blog/10-steps-creating-successful-online-course/

“Design is thinking made visual.” – Saul Bass

Marilynn Andrews, M. A.