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Educators! Win a Gift Card to Insomnia Cookies!

Educators! Click the link and take a quick survey to WIN a gift card to Insomnia Cookies!

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/QDK5SJW

#Healthy, Cooking

Air Fryer Apple Fries

Apple Fries Ingredients:

  • 3 large Gala apples
  • 1 Cup of flour
  • 3 large eggs beaten
  • 1 Cup of graham cracker crumbs
  • 1/4 Cup of sugar

Caramel Dipping sauce Ingredients:

  • 1 container of caramel sauce
Photo credit: Amanda’s Cookin

Directions:

  • Preheat air fryer to 380 degrees.
  • Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper.
  • Prep the apples: peel, core, then cut the apples into 8 wedges.
  • Add the flour into a medium size bowl. Set aside.
  • Beat the eggs, pour into a shallow dish.
  • In a second shallow dish combine the crushed graham crackers and sugar. Stir to blend.
  • Line the flour bowl first, second put the beaten eggs, and crushed graham crackers, and sugar combination.
  • Begin by tossing each wedge of apple in the flour.
  • Dredge the floured apple pieces in the beaten eggs.
  • Third, roll the apple pieces in the sugar/crushed graham cracker mixture.
  • Put each prepared apple pieces on the prepped cookie sheet.
  • Toss the apple slices and flour together in a large bowl. Set up a dredging station by put Dip each apple slice into the egg, and then into the graham cracker crumbs. Coat the slices on all sides and place the coated slices on a cookie sheet.
  • Coat the bottom of the air fryer basket with oil.
  • Do not overlap the apple pieces in the air fryer. Air fry the apples in batches. Spray the apple pieces with a light coat of oil. Air fry at 380 degrees for 5 minutes then turn the apple pieces over and for an additional 2 minutes.
  • Pour the caramel sauce into a serving bowl. Transfer the bowl to a microwave. Heat until the caramel sauce is warm and ready to serve with the apple fries.

PREP TIME: 25 min

COOK TIME: 7

SERVINGS: 8

#Healthy, Parenting, Technology

10 Types of Cyberbullying Parents Should Know About

Jack Prommel– Upsplash

Stay informed to protect yourself and children!

Cyberbullying is best defined as the use of electronic communication to bully a person, typically by sending messages of an intimidating or threatening nature. Over the past decade or so, cyber bullying has become more and more common due to the constant increase in technological use. To help parents stay informed about Cyberbullying, a list of common types of cyber bullying is provided below:

Harassment

Harassment occurs when the bully sends offensive and threatening messages via electronic forms of communication to his or her target. Multiple people may even gang up to send thousands of messages to the victim at once.

Impersonation or Fake Profiles

Impersonation is when someone creates a fake profile in another person’s name or hacks into another person’s account. The cyber bully pretends to be his or her victim online, and tarnishes the victim’s reputation.

Flaming

Flame wars involve the repeated exchanges of “angry, rude, or obscene [electronic] messages” between individuals.

Denigration

Denigration is an attempt to damage the victim’s reputation or ruin the friendships he or she has, by spreading unfounded gossip or rumours online.

Exclusion

Exclusion occurs when someone has been intentionally excluded or singled out from online group activities such as group conversations and multiplayer games.

Outing

Outing occurs when the cyber bully uses technological means to publicly “[share] private information without permission with the intent to hurt” the victim.

Natasha Hall– Upsplash

Dissing

Dissing is the act of sending or posting cruel information about your child online, to damage their reputation or friendships with others.

It can also include posting material online such as photos, screenshots or videos. The cyberbully wants to put your child down, so draws attention to what they are saying about them to make other people think they’re not cool. The cyberbully is usually someone your child knows. This can make it really upsetting.

Trickery

The cyber bully may employ methods to trick his or her victim into believing “they are speaking in confidence with a close friend so that they share sensitive information”, such as secrets or humiliating information. Once the cyber bully has obtained the information, he or she will use it against the victim by publicly disseminating it to others, “in an attempt to shame the victim.” The two forms of cyber bullying – outing and trickery – often go hand-in-hand.

Cyber stalking

Cyber stalking is a form of harassment. Victims usually receive threatening and intimidating electronic messages from cyber bullies. Victims may often start to believe “the intimidator can move offline and harm them physically,” causing them to be overly suspicious of their surroundings as well.

Cat fishing

Catfishing is when another person steals your child’s online identity, usually photos, and re-creates social networking profiles for deceptive purposes.

A catfish is someone who wants to hide who they are. They will look at your child’s social networking profile and take any information they want to create a fake persona. Sometimes they will only take your child’s photos and use fake names and information.

Nathana Rebouças– Upsplash

The Cyberbullying Problem

What you can do

Problem: If has been a crime or someone is at immediate risk of harm.

Solution: Call 911.

Problem: Someone is feeling hopeless, helpless, thinking of suicide.

Solution: To talk to someone now:

For Spanish speakers:

For deaf/hard of hearing:

Free and confidential support resources are available to you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Problem: If someone is acting differently than normal, such as always seeming sad or anxious, struggling to complete tasks, or not being able care for themselves.

Solution: Find a local counselor or other mental health services

Resource: StopBullying.Gov

#Healthy, Cooking

8 Healthy Alternatives to Ice Cream

Who doesn’t love ice cream, especially on a hot, summer day? Ice cream comes in many different flavors and assortments. To name a few, ice cream lovers can find the following flavors at their local grocery store: chocolate chip, strawberry, cookies and cream, vanilla, M&M’s and even brownie flavored.

While the frozen milk snack has so many wonderful flavors and varieties, for some the high sugar content can pose a health concern to consumers. Listed below is a list of healthy ice cream alternatives. Enjoy!

Frozen Banana and Almond Butter Bites

For the recipe to this treat, click the link!

Strawberry Banana Ice Cream Sandwiches

Get the recipe for this three ingredient healthy snack here.

Greek Yogurt Fudge Popsicles

These popsicles can be easily made at home. Click the link for the recipe.

Pumpkin Rice Pudding

For this cozy, fall treat click the link.

Chocolate Chia Pudding

A chocolatey delectable! For this recipe, click here.

Banana Ice Cream

Banana Ice Cream can be made into many different flavors! For ten flavor ideas, click the link.

Snow Monkey Ice Cream

Non-dairy, vegan, nut free, plant based, paleo-friendly. To learn more click here.

Vegan Mango Ice Cream

For this super easy, three ingredient treat, click here.

#Healthy, Cooking

Cheesy Garlic Parmesan Spinach Spaghetti Squash

Cheesy Garlic Parmesan Spinach Spaghetti Squash

This crazy delicious garlic parmesan spaghetti squash is one of the most popular recipes on Peas and Crayons — and for good reason too!

PREP TIME: 10 MINUTES

COOK TIME:1 HOUR

TOTAL TIME: 1 HOUR 10 MIN

Ingredients

  • 1 medium spaghetti squash(approx. 2-3lbs)
  • 2.5 TBSP minced garlic
  • 1 tsp avocado oil or olive oil
  • 5 oz fresh spinach chopped
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 1 TBSP cream cheese (optional but delicious!)
  • 1/2 cup freshly grated parmesan cheese plus extra for topping
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • grated or sliced mozzarella for topping to taste

Instructions

  1. Pre-heat oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Slice your spaghetti squash in half lengthwise and scoop out the seeds.
  3. For easy cutting, feel free to stick your squash in the microwave to soften it up just a tad. Pierce it a few times with a knife (to help vent so it doesn’t burst) and cook for for 3-5 minutes. The knife slides through way easier this way! Smaller squash will need about 3 minutes while larger ones will be good to go at 4-5 min.
  4. Next grab a lipped baking sheet or a rimmed baking dish.
  5. Rub the cut side of the squash with a teeny bit of olive oil and place on your baking dish/sheet cut side down. Roast for about 40 minutes, or until tender and easily pierced with a fork. Cooking time will vary a bit depending on the size of your squash, and larger squash will need to roast a bit longer to tenderize. Once ready, the once rock-hard exterior of the squash will be visibly softened with a tender interior.
  6. The squash can be roasted and stored in the fridge for a few days if you’d like to meal prep and plan ahead for a speedier dinner.
  7. While the squash roasts, start on the sauce.
  8. In a medium pot or skillet, bring a drizzle of olive oil to medium-high heat and sauté garlic until fragrant.
  9. Next add the spinach and stir until wilted. Add your cream, cream cheese (totally optional but totally tasty) and parmesan cheese and stir well.
  10. Season with salt and pepper to taste and remove from heat.
  11. Once squash is done roasting, allow to cool until easily handled or pop on an oven mit and use a fork to separate and fluff the strands of spaghetti squash.
  12. Pour your sauce over each squash boat, stir to mix, and top with a little mozzarella cheese and additional parm cheese, if desired.
  13. Bake at 350 degrees F for around 20 minutes or until hot and bubbly.
  14. For a golden cheesy topping, flip your oven to broil on high for just a minute or two until lightly browned. Dive in while it’s HOT!
#Healthy, Cooking, Gardening, Grocery Shopping, Parenting, Self-Care

10 Super Herbs and Spices for Ultimate Health Benefits

Many spices hold cultural meaning to them in households throughout the world. Did you know, these same herbs and spices can improve your well-being in countless ways? The addition of herbs and spices to your diet is the simplest way to boost your immune system and fight off diseases and conditions such as inflammation.

Ginger

Ginger is used to treat nausea caused by morning sickness, chemotherapy, and even sea sickness. Ginger can also be used as a pain management remedy as 2 grams of ginger a day fights colon inflammation the same way as aspirin.

Other research found that a mixture of ginger, cinnamon, mastic, and sesame oil decreased pain and stiffness experienced by those with osteoarthritis.

Rosemary

Rosemary been shown to suppress allergic responses and nasal congestion due to an active ingredient called rosmarinic acid.Rosemary is considered a cognitive stimulant and can help improve memory performance and quality. It is also known to boost alertness, intelligence, and focus.

Peppermint

Peppermint is known for its aromatherapy benefits however, this spice also has benefits when consumed through food. Many studies have shown that peppermint oil can improve pain management in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Peppermint helps to relax the colon and reduces abdominal bloating.

Cayenne Pepper

Cayenne Pepper is a type of chili used in many dishes around the world. Known for its spicy taste, cayenne pepper is also a remedy for those looking to reduce their appetite and increase fat burning.

Garlic

Garlic has an in-depth history for its medicinal uses. Garlic supplementation is well known for combatting sickness, including the common cold. It is advised that those who experience symptoms relating to the common cold should increase their intake of garlic.

Studies have also found garlic to cause significant reductions in blood pressure in people with high blood pressure.

Turmeric

Turmeric is a good source of curcumin, an antioxidant that eases inflammation. Research suggests that curcumin may help ease pain. And other research shows that eating even small amounts of turmeric regularly may help prevent or slow down Alzheimer’s disease, possibly by helping prevent the brain plaques that lead to dementia.

Cocoa

The cocoa bean is chock-full of flavonoids, which are antioxidants that have been shown to boost heart health. Flavonoids seem to play a role in lowering cholesterol and blood pressure and helping keep your coronary (heart) arteries healthy, among other things. Also, studied suggest that daily intake of cocoa flavanols can improve mental performance in people with and without mental impairments.

Nutmeg

Nutmeg is found to have health benefits, including its ability to relieve pain, soothe indigestion, strengthen cognitive function, detoxify the body, boost skin health, alleviate oral conditions, reduce insomnia, increase immune system function, and prevent leukemia, and improve blood circulation.

Cardamom

This sweet, pungent spice is in many pumpkin spice mixes. It’s known to soothe an upset stomach, and lab studies show it may also help fight inflammation. Cardamom may help fight bacteria in the mouth, a common cause of bad breath, cavities, and gum disease.

Oregano

Oregano has many nutrients, including vitamins K and E, calcium, iron, manganese and fiber. Also, oregano is high in antioxidants. Antioxidants prevent cell damage caused by free radicals, helping fend off heart disease, stroke and cancer. Plus, oregano has phytonutrients that help fight infections.

#Healthy, Cooking

The Gluten Free Diet

What is Gluten?

Gluten is a family of proteins found in grains, including wheat, rye, spelt, and barley. Wheat is the most common form of gluten from the grains listed.

When flour mixes with water, the gluten proteins form a sticky network that has a glue-like consistency. This glue like property makes the dough elastic and gives bread the ability to rise during baking. It also provides a chewy, satisfying texture. Interestingly, the name “gluten” comes from this glue-like property of wet dough.

Gluten can be found in many types of foods, even ones that would not be expected. While wheat is the most common, there are three main gluten substances including: wheat, barley and rye.

Wheat

Wheat is a yellowish grain used to make flour.

Wheat is commonly found in:

  • breads
  • baked goods
  • soups
  • pasta
  • cereals
  • sauces
  • salad dressings

Barley

Barley, a member of the grass family, is a major cereal grain grown in temperate climates globally. It was one of the first cultivated grains, particularly in Eurasia as early as 10,000 years ago.

Barley is commonly found in:

  • malt (malted barley flour, malted milk and milkshakes, malt extract, malt syrup, malt flavoring, malt vinegar)
  • food coloring
  • soups
  • beer
  • Brewer’s Yeast

Rye

Rye is a cereal plant that tolerates poor soils and low temperatures.

Rye is commonly found in:

  • rye bread, such as pumpernickel
  • rye beer
  • cereals

Gluten Intolerance and/or Sensitivity

There has been research on gluten intolerance and/or sensitivity and Celiac Disease. Gluten sensitivity or gluten intolerance has been coined to describe those individuals who cannot tolerate gluten and experience symptoms similar to those with celiac disease yet lack the same antibodies and intestinal damage as seen in celiac disease. Celiac Disease is an immune reaction to eating gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye.Over time, the immune reaction to eating gluten creates inflammation that damages the small intestine’s lining, leading to medical complications. It also prevents absorption of some nutrients

Photo provided by Baptist Health

Let’s consider a person without Celiac Disease but an intolerance or sensitivity to gluten. Research has categorized gluten intolerance and sensitivity to be less severe than Celiac disease. However, many of the symptoms are the same. People with non-celiac gluten sensitivity have a prevalence of extraintestinal or non-GI symptoms, such as headache, “foggy mind,” joint pain, and numbness in the legs, arms or fingers. Symptoms typically appear hours or days after gluten has been ingested, a response typical for innate immune conditions like non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

Photo provided by Very Well Health

Gluten intolerances and sensitivities are not the same as allergies. In fact, someone can experience an intolerance or sensitivity and test negative to having a gluten allergy.

#Healthy, Boundaries, Parenting, Positive Home Environment, Teachers

Setting Boundaries to Achieve A Healthy Lifestyle

People will wear you out! As a parent and individual, setting boundaries is necessary to sustain a healthy life. So much time is devoted to your work-life, children, family, spouse, and extracurricular activities. Strength is found in setting necessary boundaries and being prepared to say, “No.”

As an individual, there are many boundaries you can set to ultimately achieve a healthy life. Elizabeth Earnshaw- LMFT provides 6 boundary types and how to maintain them.

The statements provided within this article are for factual purposes, only. If you are seeking additional help in the realms of setting boundaries and maintaining relationships, please consult with your local therapist.

What Are Boundaries?

Boudaries are not a reason to be unkind or build a brick wall. Establishing healthy boundaries are essential to healthy relationships. Without healthy boundaries, relationships do not thrive—they result in feelings of resentment, disappointment, or violation. Boundaries are your personal limits.

Types of Boundaries

Physical Boundaries

Physical boundaries center around physical proximity. This includes personal space and attending to your physical needs. If you are not a hugger, it is OK to let people know you do not like to be touched that way.

Healthy physical boundaries might sound like:

  • “I am really tired. I need to sit down now.”
  • “I am not a big hugger. I am a handshake person.”
  • “I need to eat. I am going to go grab something.”
  • “I am allergic to [insert here], so we can’t have that in our home.”
  • “No. I don’t want you to touch me like that.”
  • “Don’t go into my room without asking first.”

Physical boundary violations feel like receiving inappropriate or unwanted touch, being denied your physical needs (told to keep walking when you are tired or that you need to wait to eat or drink).

Emotional Boundaries

Setting clear emotional boundaries includes knowing how much emotional energy you have and how much you can give. Also, this includes knowing when and how to respond emotionally. If you know someone will react poorly to your emotional energy, limit how much you share with this individual. If there is a healthy emotional relationship between you and another individual, you may be more comfortable with sharing information.

Healthy Emotional Boundaries may look like this:

  • “When I share my feelings with you and get criticized, it makes me totally shut down. I can only share with you if you are able to respond respectfully to me.”
  • “I am so sorry you are having such a tough time. Right now, I am not in a place to take in all of this information. Do you think we can come back to this conversation later?”
  • “I am having a hard time and really need to talk. Are you in a place to listen right now?”
  • “I really can’t talk about that right now. It isn’t the right time.”

When the boundary line is crossed, you can expect the following:

  • Dismissing and criticizing feelings
  • Asking questions that are not appropriate for the relationship
  • Reading or going through personal and emotional information
  • Asking people to justify their feelings
  • Assuming we know how other people feel
  • Telling other people how they feel
  • “Emotionally dumping” on people without their permission
  • Sharing inappropriate emotional information with your children

Time Boundaries

Time is non-refundable. There is great value in protecting your time. Setting time boundaries means understanding your priorities and setting aside enough time for the many areas of your life without overcommitting. Setting time boundaries encompasses the ability to say, “No.”

Healthy Time Boundaries look like:

  • “I can’t come to that event this weekend.”
  • “I can only stay for an hour.”
  • “Do you have time to chat today?”
  • “I would love to help, but I would be overcommitting myself. Is there another time?”
  • “We have family time on Sundays, so we won’t make it.”
  • “I am happy to help with that. My hourly rate is…”

When these boundaries are crossed, it looks like the following:

  • Keeping people in conversations longer than intended.
  • Cancelling on people because we have overcommitted
  • Demanding time from people
  • Asking professionals for their time and not paying them

Intellectual Boundaries

Intellectual boundaries refer to your thoughts, ideas, and curiosity. Healthy intellectual boundaries include respect for the ideas of other people, and they can be violated when your thoughts and curiosity are shut down, dismissed, or belittled. 

Healthy Intellectual Boundaries look like:

  • “I know we disagree, but I won’t let you belittle me like that.”
  • “I would love to talk about this more, but I don’t think talking about it during Thanksgiving dinner is the best time.”
  • “When we talk about this, we don’t get very far. I think it is a good idea to avoid the conversation right now.”
  • “I can respect that we have different opinions on this.”

The presence of intellectual boundaries does not mean the acceptance of all ideas, concepts, and perspectives. Recognizing the differences between you and others and choosing to maintain a healthy relationship and discourse is the direction to take for achieving healthy intellectual boundaries.

Material Boundaries

Material possessions include your car, home, furniture and money. It is important to understand the items you can and cannot share with others. Having healthy material limits include the following:

  • “I can’t lend out my car. I am the only person on the insurance.”
  • “We can’t give any more money. We would be happy to help in another way.”
  • “Sure! I am happy to share my dress with you. Just a heads-up, I do need it back by Friday.”

Material boundaries are violated when your things are destroyed or stolen or when they are “borrowed” too frequently. Another material violation is the use of materials (money and possessions) to manipulate and control relationships.

Content provided by Elizabeth Earnshaw- LMFT

Click Here to read more!

#Healthy, Nighttime Routines, Parenting, Sleep

Types of Common Sleep Disorders in Children

Annie Spratt from Unsplash

When thinking about the topic of healthy sleeping patterns for children, there is a lingering question of ‘how’ and ‘why’ are sleeping patterns potentially unhealthy for children? As a means of providing factual information, a general background to common sleeping disorders is provided.

As always, parents are encouraged to consult with a medical professional if there is a concern. The evidence within this article are for factual purposes only and not intended for medical advice.

At times, children experience discomfort before and during bedtime. This is normal. However, sleep disorders are generally diagnosed when there seems to be a lot of problems in bed.

What is Sleep Apnea?

Sleep Apnea is best defined as when a person stops breathing for a specified amount of time during sleep. This is usually due to an obstruction or blockage in an airway. The medical term is obstructive sleep apnea. Over time, sleep apnea has a long term effect on learning, growth, behavior, and heart problems. When children experience sleep apnea, their oxygen levels fall. In turn, this causes the child to experience discomfort in sleeping due to the inability to breathe.

Common signs of obstructive sleep apnea in children include the following:

  • Snoring, snorting, or gasping for air, breathing heavily
  • Bedwetting
  • Restless sleeping and sleeping in unusual positions
  • Sleepwalking and waking from nightmares

What is Restless Leg Syndrome?

Restless Leg Syndrome is a sleep disorder that can affect children and adolescents. Restless Leg Syndrome occurs when a child is uncomfortable and resists the ability to stop moving his or her legs. Although this can occur throughout the day, when the symptoms occur during sleep, it can then be considered a sleeping disorder.

When experiencing these symptoms, children generally get up and walk around, toss and turn and kick. As a result, the child misses a significant amount of sleep when restless leg syndrome occurs, due to this discomfort. When attempting to fall asleep with restless leg syndrome, children may need to get out of bed to stretch and move around. Children with this sleeping disorder are often sleepy during the daytime and may require additional sleeping time or naps.

Restless leg syndrome may also cause moodiness, irritability, hyperactivity, and difficulty concentrating at school.

What Are Nightmares?

Leo Rivas from Unsplash

If you have children, I am sure you have been awaken in the middle of the night to re-tuck them into bed due to a bad dream or nightmare. Nightmares cause children to wake up crying and can lead to stress at bedtime. Nightmares are scary dreams. Nightmares tend to happen when children have reached another level within their REMS (Rapid Eye Movement Sleep) cycle. The longer a child stays asleep, the more intense the dream tends to be due to the increased stage within the sleep cycle.

Once a nightmare occurs, children experience difficulty with going back to sleep. When a child is experiencing a nightmare, parents are cautioned to look out for the following: crying, shaking, kicking, screaming, disorientation, sweating and breathing fast. Nightmares can have an effect on children during the day, as they may have lost significant hours of sleep the night before.

What Is Hypersomnia?

Annie Spratt from Unsplash

Hypersomnia is narcolepsy. Narcolepsy is the inability to stay awake during the daytime hours followed by hallucinations and loss of muscle movements. Children that experience hypersomnia are expected to need additional naps, to get through the day. This condition is stated to be rare in children. Children that experience hypersomnia will require additional sleep after waking from 10 or more hours of sleep. Common symptoms associated with hypersomnia are disorientation, a need for naps, slow speech, and loss of appetite.

#Healthy, Cooking, Gardening

Benefits of Superfood- Spinach

Spinach Nutrition - Cooked and Raw Spinach Nutrition Facts
Photo provided by Good Housekeeping

Leafy green spinach is a superfood that can be prepared a number of ways due to its versatility. Spinach can be used within green smoothies aa a source of fiber. Spinach can also be baked into casseroles and fried into breakfast entree’s such as eggs. Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) is a leafy green vegetable that originated in Persia. It belongs to the amaranth family and is related to beets and quinoa. Did you know spinach offers major benefits to those who choose consume this superfood?

Spinach is Rich In Nutrients

Spinach is a source of Vitamin K which aids in bone support. Vitamin K works to enhance a protein called Osteocaic that is responsible for stabilizing calcium in bones. Spinach also provides a source of calcium, Vitamin D, fiber, potassium, magnesium, and Vitamin C. The combination of these nutrients all aid in bone health.

Spinach is high in Vitamin A which eliminates viruses and bacteria. Vitamin A helps our skin and mucus membranes. Vitamin A is also known to be good for growth in bodily tissues including skin and hair. To help reduce the loss of hair and infections, the consumption of spinach is the solution.

Rich in Vitamin C, spinach supports heart health. There is a rumor that spinach helps with facial wrinkles. Pregnant mothers are advised to consume spinach to help with prenatal and cardiovascular diseases. Spinach is rich in lutein which helps prevents heart attacks and cures heart diseases.

Spinach is Low in Calories

Spinach is mostly made of water. One cup of cooked spinach is 41 calories. Spinach provides 160% of the daily goal for Vitamin A and about 40% for Vitamin C.

Spinach is a Source of Energy

Through magnesium, spinach is able to help generate energy throughout a days span. Spinach is a excellent source of folate. As you navigate through the day, the consumption of spinach helps turn your body into usable energy. Spinach is alkaline in nature. This is why spinach is a number one choice for many athletes.

Spinach Supports Brain Health

Spinach contains anti-inflammatory effects that aid in brain health. One study shows that when older adults consume one to two servings of spinach daily, that person had the same cognitive abilities as someone 11 years younger in comparison to those who did not consume greens.

Spinach Vs. Kale

Nutrition Faceoff: Kale vs. Spinach | HealthCastle.com
Photo provided by Health Castle

Spinach and Kale are similar in a number of ways. For starters, both vegetables are leafy greens that are high in fiber. Which is better for you? Let’s look at the facts and you can determine which route to take.

  • Kale has more calories per 100 g serving than spinach. It should be noted that both vegetables are still very low-cal choices.
  • Both contain fiber and several other important micronutrients in varying amounts, including vitamin A, riboflavin, and calcium.
  • They’re both high in vitamin K — a key vitamin involved in healthy blood clotting and bone formation.
  • They’ve also each been shown to positively impact heart health by improving several heart disease risk factors, such as high cholesterol and blood pressure.
  • Add kale or spinach to a salad topped with vegetables and a good source of protein.
  • Both are linked to improved heart health, increased weight loss, and protection against disease.

The Best Sautéed Spinach

Crunchy Creamy Sweet provides a recipe for the best sautéed spinach and it looks delicious!

Prep Time- 2 mins

Cook Time-7 mins

Total Time- 9 mins

A fresh spinach sauteed with garlic and onions in olive oil and butter. This easiest and fastest spinach side dish is healthy and low-carb diet friendly.

Course: Side Dish

Servings: 4 Servings

Calories: 85 Calories


  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 medium white onion chopped
  • 4 teaspoons minced garlic see note
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 8 oz fresh spinach
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Instructions

  1. In a large skillet, heat up olive oil. Add onion and saute for 4 minutes. Add garlic and butter and saute until the onion is starting to brown.
  2. Add soy sauce and stir well. Add spinach and gently toss to mix with sauteed onion.
  3. Cook until spinach is wilted. Season with salt and pepper.
  4. Serve immediately.