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Educators! Win a Gift Card to Insomnia Cookies!

Educators! Click the link and take a quick survey to WIN a gift card to Insomnia Cookies!

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/QDK5SJW

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The Benefits of Walking or Running in The Rain

When it starts to rain, typically, the first instinct is to run and take cover inside. However, after reading this today, you may change your mind. This is because you will learn the health benefits of going out into the rain.

1. The air is purer.

After a heavy rainfall, the air is purer because as raindrops fall through the atmosphere, they have the ability to attract hundreds of particles of pollutants like dander, soot, sulfates and bacteria before hitting the ground.

2. Rain is good for your hair and skin.

Rain water is high in alkaline which is good for your hair and skin and does not contain harmful minerals. High levels of humidity in the air help keep your skin fresh.

3. Walks in the rain burn more calories and build more muscles.

Much like walks on the beach, walking or running in muddier surfaces forces you to use more muscle strength to move your legs and feet.

4. Chemicals released in the rain are stress reducing.

When water molecules crash together, as they do in falling rain, they create negative ions. Some researchers believe when these negative ions are inhaled, they create a chemical reaction that can reduce stress and anxiety. Read more on The Pyschology of Rain by clicking the link.

5. Running in the rain can increase metabolism and performance.

When performing any kind of exercise, your body’s temperature tends to increase, if you are working out in colder temperatures, the environment is helping cool your body and maintain a more stable temperature. This allows you to work harder for longer due to a lesser risk of overheating. As always, consult your Physician before trying a now workout regime.

6. Boost Your Immune System

This is done by exposing yourself to various different temperatures and life outside of the house. As a result, you will develop a stronger immune system for the future.

7. Connect with Nature

This is another way to connect with nature and it’s elements. Typically, we are indoors when it rains. It is a nice concept to embrace all of nature’s elements.

Read more here

Tips to Successfully Run in The Rain

1. Stay safe and inside if it is a severe storm or produces thunder, lightening, hail or tornadoes.

2. Dress appropriately in rain gear that will keep you somewhat dry. The goal is to enjoy the rain but not develop hypothermia or any other related illness.

3. Seal off electronics such as your iPhone or watch in a waterproof case.

#Healthy, Gardening, Self-Care, Weather

10 Beautiful Houseplants You Should Consider

POTHOS
Epipremnum aureum

If you tend to forget to water your plants, this one is for you! Pathos are the easiest houseplants to maintain. This plant has heart shaped leaves differing in colors green and yellow. Thrives in bright, indirect light, but can tolerate medium to low indirect light. Not suited for intense, direct sun. Water this plant every 1-2 weeks.

PARLOR PALM
Chamaedorea elegans

The parlor palm is one of the most heavily sold houseplant palms in the world. It’s adapted to relatively low light, can handle lower temperatures, and grows in attractive clumps with light-textured foliage cloaking thin trunks. Water every 1-2 weeks. This plant grows in bright indirect sunlight but not intense sunlight.

WATERMELON PEPEROMIA
Peperomia argyreia

Watermelon Peperomia are incredibly easy-going, low-care houseplants–great for beginners! Water the Watermelon Peperomia when the top 50%-75% of the soil is dry. Watermelon Peperomia will grow in medium to bright indirect light.

POLKA DOT PLANT
Hypoestes phyllostachya

Warm temperatures and humidity are key to growing polka dot plants. To prevent overgrowth, pinch back the top two leaves on each stem on a weekly basis. For the polka dot plant, bright, indirect light is ideal for growth. Water this plant moderately and keep soil moist.

SPIDER PLANT
Chlorophytum comosum

For the spider plant, bright indirect sunlight is ideal for growth. Water roughly once a week spring to fall, occasionally in winter, average warmth.

ALOE VERA
Aloe vera

Aloe vera is a succulent plant species of the genus Aloe. The name comes from two root words: “aloeh” is an Arabic word meaning bitter, and “vera” is Latin for “truth.” Place in bright, indirect sunlight or artificial light. Water aloe vera plants deeply, but infrequently. In other words, the soil should feel moist after watering, but should be allowed to dry out to some extent before you water again.

JADE
Crassula ovata

Allow the soil to dry out between waterings, and water only sparingly in the winter months. This plant is toxic to cats and dogs. The jade plant flourishes in good health with plenty of light.

KALANCHOE
Kalanchoe blossfeldiana

Kalanchoe (Kalanchoe blossfeldiana) is a popular houseplant. It is often available for sale during late winter and spring months. As an indoor plant in cooler climates, kalanchoe grows best in full sun or bright indirect light. Water this plant every 2 weeks.

AFRICAN VIOLET
Saintpaulia ionantha

African Violet originates from Africa and the flowers look like violets. Never place an African Violet in direct sunlight. Keep soil moist when watering.

ZZ PLANT
Zamioculcas zamiifolia

ZZ’s one major drawback is that all parts of the plant are poisonous. Situate a ZZ plant in low to bright indirect light, and water when fully dry. Water this plant once a month. Read more here.

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Different Types of Rain

Did you know that there are different types of rain?

Rain

Drops larger than drizzle (0.02 inch / 0.5 mm or more) are considered rain. Rain is liquid water that falls from a cloud in the form of droplets. Rain is one of the six main types of precipitation. One droplet of water spends on average around eight days in suspension before falling back to Earth as rain.

Drizzle

Drizzle is light rain falling in very small droplets. Drizzle drops have a diameter of usually less than 0.5 mm. The drops appear almost to float, and so make even slight movements of the air visible. The clouds that produce drizzle have low bases, usually less than 1,000 feet in altitude.

Ice Pellets or Sleet

Ice pellets form when a layer of above-freezing air is located between 1,500 and 3,000 meters (5,000 and 10,000 ft) above the ground, with sub-freezing air both above and below it. Ice pellets are a form of precipitation consisting of small, translucent balls of ice. Ice pellets originate as raindrops or snowflakes (less common) that generally fall from Altostratus or Nimbostratus. They fall into a subcloud layer of warm air where the snowflakes melt or partially melt, and then fall into a cold layer of air (below 0 °C) where they freeze and reach the ground as frozen precipitation.

Hail

Hail is pellets of frozen rain which fall in showers from cumulonimbus clouds. Hail is a form of solid precipitation. It is distinct from ice pellets, though the two are often confused. It consists of balls or irregular lumps of ice, each of which is called a hailstone. Certain parts of the world receive more hail than others. China and Midwestern United States experiences frequent hail storms. In fact, the Great Plains region of the United States and Canada is called “Hail Alley.” Hailstones can cause extreme damage to buildings, vehicles, and crops.

Snow

Snow is precipitation in the form of ice crystals. Once an ice crystal has formed, it absorbs and freezes additional water vapor from the surrounding air, growing into a snow crystal or snow pellet, which then falls to Earth. Snowflakes are clusters of ice crystals that fall from a cloud. Snow may also crunch and creak. A layer of snow is made up of many tiny ice grains surrounded by air and when you step on it, you compress the grains.

Snow Grains

Snow grains are a form of precipitation. Snow grains are characterized as very small, white, opaque grains of ice that are fairly flat or elongated. Their diameter is generally less than 1 mm. Snow grains fall mostly from Stratus or from fog. Snow grains usually fall in small quantities in the mountains.

Ice Crystals

In very cold regions, they are falling crystals of ice in the form of needles, columns, or plates. Ice crystals are solid ice exhibiting atomic ordering on various length scales and include hexagonal columns, hexagonal plates, dendritic crystals, and diamond dust.